News & Happenings

Lawnside Historical Marker Honors Blacks Who Fought in the Revolutionary War

Apr 22, 2024

Design Divi sites with Divi Supreme

The Heroic Service of the African Americans in the American Revolution

Panel 1

Fort Mercer., October 1777.

At least 4% of Continental Army soldiers comprised men of African, Native American, or mixed ancestry. In the first and second Rhode Island Regiments, persons of color amounted to almost 15% of the men. In October 1777, these two regiments fought heroically  Fort Mercer and Mifflin, Delaware River forts that prevented the British Army in Philadelphia from receiving supplies by water.

Lose No Time.

At the beginning of October 1777, only militia manned Fort Mercer. On October 9, Colonel Christopher Greene, commander of the first Rhode Island., receive orders from General George Washington, to “lose no time,” in moving his regiment to Fort Mercer. Over the next two days, it’s 250 men marched 48 miles without sleep.

October 18th, the Second Rhode Island Regiment arrived at Fort Mercer. The two regiments alternated between duty at Fort Mifflin, digging and carpentering at Mercer, and training to defend the ramparts. October 21st, their work at Mercer intensified after learning that 1600 Hessians were coming to attack the Fort.

A Bloody Victory

October 22nd., the Hessians attack began about 4:00 PM with a twenty minute cannonade, followed by 1000 Hessians assailing the fort. Some Rhode Islands fired blindly, while others remained calm, methodically shooting the attacking Germans. The Hessian assault was brave but doomed. Lashed by artillery and musketry the Hessian struggled through the abatis, filled in sections of the ditch were hundreds of brush, and attempted to climb the ramparts.  The vertical ramparts; however, proved too high to scale without ladders. Forty-Five minutes after it began the attack collapsed, and the Hessians began the retreat, returning to Philadelphia. They suffered over 380 officers and men killed, wounded and captured. The Rhode Islanders had fourteen officers and men killed and at least 23 wounded. Including “Tom Reynolds, “Fort Mercer was a continental victory, one of the most complete of the American Revolution.

Panel 2 : MAP

Panel 3

New Jersey American soldiers in American Revolution include Oliver Cromwell, (born in Black Horse (Now Columbus), Burlington County, as a freeman. Cromwell participated in almost every major battle of the war’s northern campaign and endured the same depredations as other soldiers in Jockey Hollow during the Winter there. He expressed great pride in George Washington signing his discharge after having served for six years in New Jersey Second Regiment.

His famous 1851 painting Washington Crossing, the Delaware artist Emmanuel included  a black man handling an oar to propel the Durham boat to the Jersey Shore. Some have claimed this. detects Oliver Cromwell.

Titus, a 22-year-old enslaved man escaped his bonds in Shrewsberry, New Jersey, during 1775 and travelled to Norfolk with other Monmouth County men of color to join Virginia Governor Dunmore’s Ethiopian regiment, The British offered freedom at wars end through any and slave man who fought for them, and many took them at their word. Dunmore disbanded the regiment in 1776. Titus then remained unknown until the Battle Monmouth in June 1778.  Leader of the Black Parade., Titus became known as Colonel Tye, and he rode with the Queens Rangers. Tye’s Brigade gained notoriety totality in 1780, from a series of raids, including one against Joshua Huddy. Tye suffered wound there that caused his demise from gangrene within weeks.

Excerpt from a letter from Monmouth County,

Tye, with his party of about 20, black and whites, left Friday afternoon, and carried off prisoners Captain Barnes Smock and Gilbert Vanmater; at the same time spiked up the Iron 4 pounder at Captain Smock’s horses, but took no ammunition: two of the artillery horses, and two of Captain Smocks horses were likewise taken off.

” The above-mentioned Tye is a negroe, who bears the title of Colonel, and commands a motly crew at Sandy Hook.

New Jersey Gazette, June 14th, 1780, Page 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regiments.

The borough of Lawnside and the Lawnside Historical Society dedicated a Revolutionary War marker commemorating the first Black battalions that participated in a New Jersey Battle during the Revolutionary War. The Battle was the Battle of Red Bank in National Park on October 22, 1777. The Regiments were the 1st and 2nd Rhode Island Regiments. Design Divi sites with Divi Supreme

The Heroic Service of the African Americans in the American Revolutionary

 

Fort Mercer., October 1777.

At least 4% of Continental Army soldiers comprised men of African, Native American, or mixed ancestry. In the first and second Rhode Island Regiments, persons of color amounted to almost 15% of the men. In October 1777, these two regiments fought heroically  Fort Mercer and Mifflin, Delaware River forts that prevented the British Army in Philadelphia from receiving supplies by water.

Lose No Time.

At the beginning of October 1777, only militia manned Fort Mercer. On October 9, Colonel Christopher Greene, commander of the first Rhode Island., receive orders from General George Washington, to “lose no time,” in moving his regiment to Fort Mercer. Over the next two days, it’s 250 men marched 48 miles without sleep.

October 18th, the Second Rhode Island Regiment arrived at Fort Mercer. The two regiments alternated between duty at Fort Mifflin, digging and carpentering at Mercer, and training to defend the ramparts. October 21st, their work at Mercer intensified after learning that 1600 Hessians were coming to attack the Fort.

A Bloody Victory

October 22nd., the Hessians attack began about 4:00 PM with a twenty minute cannonade, followed by 1000 Hessians assailing the fort. Some Rhode Islands fired blindly, while others remained calm, methodically shooting the attacking Germans. The Hessian assault was brave but doomed. Lashed by artillery and musketry the Hessian struggled through the abatis, filled in sections of the ditch were hundreds of brush, and attempted to climb the ramparts.  The vertical ramparts; however, proved too high to scale without ladders. Forty-Five minutes after it began the attack collapsed, and the Hessians began the retreat, returning to Philadelphia. They suffered over 380 officers and men killed, wounded and captured. The Rhode Islanders had fourteen officers and men killed and at least 23 wounded. Including “Tom Reynolds, “Fort Mercer was a continental victory, one of the most complete of the American Revolution.

 

New Jersey American soldiers in American Revolution include Oliver Cromwell, (born in Black Horse (Now Columbus), Burlington County, as a freeman. Cromwell participated in almost every major battle of the war’s northern campaign and endured the same depredations as other soldiers in Jockey Hollow during the Winter there. He expressed great pride in George Washington signing his discharge after having served for six years in New Jersey Second Regiment.

His famous 1851 painting Washington Crossing, the Delaware artist Emmanuel included  a black man handling an oar to propel the Durham boat to the Jersey Shore. Some have claimed this. detects Oliver Cromwell.

Titus, a 22-year-old enslaved man escaped his bonds in Shrewsberry, New Jersey, during 1775 and travelled to Norfolk with other Monmouth County men of color to join Virginia Governor Dunmore’s Ethiopian regiment, The British offered freedom at wars end through any and slave man who fought for them, and many took them at their word. Dunmore disbanded the regiment in 1776. Titus then remained unknown until the Battle Monmouth in June 1778.  Leader of the Black Parade., Titus became known as Colonel Tye, and he rode with the Queens Rangers. Tye’s Brigade gained notoriety totality in 1780, from a series of raids, including one against Joshua Huddy. Tye suffered wound there that caused his demise from gangrene within weeks.

Excerpt from a letter from Monmouth County,

Tye, with his party of about 20, black and whites, left Friday afternoon, and carried off prisoners Captain Barnes Smock and Gilbert Vanmater; at the same time spiked up the Iron 4 pounder at Captain Smock’s horses, but took no ammunition: two of the artillery horses, and two of Captain Smocks horses were likewise taken off.

” The above-mentioned Tye is a negroe, who bears the title of Colonel, and commands a motly crew at Sandy Hook.

New Jersey Gazette, June 14th, 1780, Page 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regiments.

The borough of Lawnside and the Lawnside Historical Society dedicated a Revolutionary War marker commemorating the first Black battalions that participated in a New Jersey Battle during the Revolutionary War. The Battle was the Battle of Red Bank in National Park on October 22, 1777. The Regiments were the 1st and 2nd Rhode Island Regiments. Design Divi sites with Divi Supreme

Design Divi sites with Divi Supreme

The Heroic Service of the African Americans in the American Revolution

Panel 1

Fort Mercer., October 1777.

At least 4% of Continental Army soldiers comprised men of African, Native American, or mixed ancestry. In the first and second Rhode Island Regiments, persons of color amounted to almost 15% of the men. In October 1777, these two regiments fought heroically  Fort Mercer and Mifflin, Delaware River forts that prevented the British Army in Philadelphia from receiving supplies by water.

Lose No Time.

At the beginning of October 1777, only militia manned Fort Mercer. On October 9, Colonel Christopher Greene, commander of the first Rhode Island., receive orders from General George Washington, to “lose no time,” in moving his regiment to Fort Mercer. Over the next two days, it’s 250 men marched 48 miles without sleep.

October 18th, the Second Rhode Island Regiment arrived at Fort Mercer. The two regiments alternated between duty at Fort Mifflin, digging and carpentering at Mercer, and training to defend the ramparts. October 21st, their work at Mercer intensified after learning that 1600 Hessians were coming to attack the Fort.

A Bloody Victory

October 22nd., the Hessians attack began about 4:00 PM with a twenty minute cannonade, followed by 1000 Hessians assailing the fort. Some Rhode Islands fired blindly, while others remained calm, methodically shooting the attacking Germans. The Hessian assault was brave but doomed. Lashed by artillery and musketry the Hessian struggled through the abatis, filled in sections of the ditch were hundreds of brush, and attempted to climb the ramparts.  The vertical ramparts; however, proved too high to scale without ladders. Forty-Five minutes after it began the attack collapsed, and the Hessians began the retreat, returning to Philadelphia. They suffered over 380 officers and men killed, wounded and captured. The Rhode Islanders had fourteen officers and men killed and at least 23 wounded. Including “Tom Reynolds, “Fort Mercer was a continental victory, one of the most complete of the American Revolution.

Panel 2 : MAP

Panel 3

New Jersey American soldiers in American Revolution include Oliver Cromwell, (born in Black Horse (Now Columbus), Burlington County, as a freeman. Cromwell participated in almost every major battle of the war’s northern campaign and endured the same depredations as other soldiers in Jockey Hollow during the Winter there. He expressed great pride in George Washington signing his discharge after having served for six years in New Jersey Second Regiment.

His famous 1851 painting Washington Crossing, the Delaware artist Emmanuel included  a black man handling an oar to propel the Durham boat to the Jersey Shore. Some have claimed this. detects Oliver Cromwell.

Titus, a 22-year-old enslaved man escaped his bonds in Shrewsberry, New Jersey, during 1775 and travelled to Norfolk with other Monmouth County men of color to join Virginia Governor Dunmore’s Ethiopian regiment, The British offered freedom at wars end through any and slave man who fought for them, and many took them at their word. Dunmore disbanded the regiment in 1776. Titus then remained unknown until the Battle Monmouth in June 1778.  Leader of the Black Parade., Titus became known as Colonel Tye, and he rode with the Queens Rangers. Tye’s Brigade gained notoriety totality in 1780, from a series of raids, including one against Joshua Huddy. Tye suffered wound there that caused his demise from gangrene within weeks.

Excerpt from a letter from Monmouth County,

Tye, with his party of about 20, black and whites, left Friday afternoon, and carried off prisoners Captain Barnes Smock and Gilbert Vanmater; at the same time spiked up the Iron 4 pounder at Captain Smock’s horses, but took no ammunition: two of the artillery horses, and two of Captain Smocks horses were likewise taken off.

” The above-mentioned Tye is a negroe, who bears the title of Colonel, and commands a motly crew at Sandy Hook.

New Jersey Gazette, June 14th, 1780, Page 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regiments.

The Heroic Service of the African Americans in the American Revolutionary

 

Fort Mercer., October 1777.

At least 4% of Continental Army soldiers comprised men of African, Native American, or mixed ancestry. In the first and second Rhode Island Regiments, persons of color amounted to almost 15% of the men. In October 1777, these two regiments fought heroically  Fort Mercer and Mifflin, Delaware River forts that prevented the British Army in Philadelphia from receiving supplies by water.

Lose No Time.

At the beginning of October 1777, only militia manned Fort Mercer. On October 9, Colonel Christopher Greene, commander of the first Rhode Island., receive orders from General George Washington, to “lose no time,” in moving his regiment to Fort Mercer. Over the next two days, it’s 250 men marched 48 miles without sleep.

October 18th, the Second Rhode Island Regiment arrived at Fort Mercer. The two regiments alternated between duty at Fort Mifflin, digging and carpentering at Mercer, and training to defend the ramparts. October 21st, their work at Mercer intensified after learning that 1600 Hessians were coming to attack the Fort.

A Bloody Victory

October 22nd., the Hessians attack began about 4:00 PM with a twenty minute cannonade, followed by 1000 Hessians assailing the fort. Some Rhode Islands fired blindly, while others remained calm, methodically shooting the attacking Germans. The Hessian assault was brave but doomed. Lashed by artillery and musketry the Hessian struggled through the abatis, filled in sections of the ditch were hundreds of brush, and attempted to climb the ramparts.  The vertical ramparts; however, proved too high to scale without ladders. Forty-Five minutes after it began the attack collapsed, and the Hessians began the retreat, returning to Philadelphia. They suffered over 380 officers and men killed, wounded and captured. The Rhode Islanders had fourteen officers and men killed and at least 23 wounded. Including “Tom Reynolds, “Fort Mercer was a continental victory, one of the most complete of the American Revolution.

 

New Jersey American soldiers in American Revolution include Oliver Cromwell, (born in Black Horse (Now Columbus), Burlington County, as a freeman. Cromwell participated in almost every major battle of the war’s northern campaign and endured the same depredations as other soldiers in Jockey Hollow during the Winter there. He expressed great pride in George Washington signing his discharge after having served for six years in New Jersey Second Regiment.

His famous 1851 painting Washington Crossing, the Delaware artist Emmanuel included  a black man handling an oar to propel the Durham boat to the Jersey Shore. Some have claimed this. detects Oliver Cromwell.

Titus, a 22-year-old enslaved man escaped his bonds in Shrewsberry, New Jersey, during 1775 and travelled to Norfolk with other Monmouth County men of color to join Virginia Governor Dunmore’s Ethiopian regiment, The British offered freedom at wars end through any and slave man who fought for them, and many took them at their word. Dunmore disbanded the regiment in 1776. Titus then remained unknown until the Battle Monmouth in June 1778.  Leader of the Black Parade., Titus became known as Colonel Tye, and he rode with the Queens Rangers. Tye’s Brigade gained notoriety totality in 1780, from a series of raids, including one against Joshua Huddy. Tye suffered wound there that caused his demise from gangrene within weeks.

Excerpt from a letter from Monmouth County,

Tye, with his party of about 20, black and whites, left Friday afternoon, and carried off prisoners Captain Barnes Smock and Gilbert Vanmater; at the same time spiked up the Iron 4 pounder at Captain Smock’s horses, but took no ammunition: two of the artillery horses, and two of Captain Smocks horses were likewise taken off.

” The above-mentioned Tye is a negroe, who bears the title of Colonel, and commands a motly crew at Sandy Hook.

New Jersey Gazette, June 14th, 1780, Page 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regiments.

The borough of Lawnside and the Lawnside Historical Society dedicated a Revolutionary War marker commemorating the first Black battalions that participated in a New Jersey Battle during the Revolutionary War. The Battle was the Battle of Red Bank in National Park on October 22, 1777. The Regiments were the 1st and 2nd Rhode Island Regiments. Design Divi sites with Divi Supreme

Design Divi sites with Divi Supreme

The Heroic Service of the African Americans in the American Revolution

Panel 1

Fort Mercer., October 1777.

At least 4% of Continental Army soldiers comprised men of African, Native American, or mixed ancestry. In the first and second Rhode Island Regiments, persons of color amounted to almost 15% of the men. In October 1777, these two regiments fought heroically  Fort Mercer and Mifflin, Delaware River forts that prevented the British Army in Philadelphia from receiving supplies by water.

Lose No Time.

At the beginning of October 1777, only militia manned Fort Mercer. On October 9, Colonel Christopher Greene, commander of the first Rhode Island., receive orders from General George Washington, to “lose no time,” in moving his regiment to Fort Mercer. Over the next two days, it’s 250 men marched 48 miles without sleep.

October 18th, the Second Rhode Island Regiment arrived at Fort Mercer. The two regiments alternated between duty at Fort Mifflin, digging and carpentering at Mercer, and training to defend the ramparts. October 21st, their work at Mercer intensified after learning that 1600 Hessians were coming to attack the Fort.

A Bloody Victory

October 22nd., the Hessians attack began about 4:00 PM with a twenty minute cannonade, followed by 1000 Hessians assailing the fort. Some Rhode Islands fired blindly, while others remained calm, methodically shooting the attacking Germans. The Hessian assault was brave but doomed. Lashed by artillery and musketry the Hessian struggled through the abatis, filled in sections of the ditch were hundreds of brush, and attempted to climb the ramparts.  The vertical ramparts; however, proved too high to scale without ladders. Forty-Five minutes after it began the attack collapsed, and the Hessians began the retreat, returning to Philadelphia. They suffered over 380 officers and men killed, wounded and captured. The Rhode Islanders had fourteen officers and men killed and at least 23 wounded. Including “Tom Reynolds, “Fort Mercer was a continental victory, one of the most complete of the American Revolution.

Panel 2 : MAP

Panel 3

New Jersey American soldiers in American Revolution include Oliver Cromwell, (born in Black Horse (Now Columbus), Burlington County, as a freeman. Cromwell participated in almost every major battle of the war’s northern campaign and endured the same depredations as other soldiers in Jockey Hollow during the Winter there. He expressed great pride in George Washington signing his discharge after having served for six years in New Jersey Second Regiment.

His famous 1851 painting Washington Crossing, the Delaware artist Emmanuel included  a black man handling an oar to propel the Durham boat to the Jersey Shore. Some have claimed this. detects Oliver Cromwell.

Titus, a 22-year-old enslaved man escaped his bonds in Shrewsberry, New Jersey, during 1775 and travelled to Norfolk with other Monmouth County men of color to join Virginia Governor Dunmore’s Ethiopian regiment, The British offered freedom at wars end through any and slave man who fought for them, and many took them at their word. Dunmore disbanded the regiment in 1776. Titus then remained unknown until the Battle Monmouth in June 1778.  Leader of the Black Parade., Titus became known as Colonel Tye, and he rode with the Queens Rangers. Tye’s Brigade gained notoriety totality in 1780, from a series of raids, including one against Joshua Huddy. Tye suffered wound there that caused his demise from gangrene within weeks.

Excerpt from a letter from Monmouth County,

Tye, with his party of about 20, black and whites, left Friday afternoon, and carried off prisoners Captain Barnes Smock and Gilbert Vanmater; at the same time spiked up the Iron 4 pounder at Captain Smock’s horses, but took no ammunition: two of the artillery horses, and two of Captain Smocks horses were likewise taken off.

” The above-mentioned Tye is a negroe, who bears the title of Colonel, and commands a motly crew at Sandy Hook.

New Jersey Gazette, June 14th, 1780, Page 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regiments.

The Heroic Service of the African Americans in the American Revolutionary

 

Fort Mercer., October 1777.

At least 4% of Continental Army soldiers comprised men of African, Native American, or mixed ancestry. In the first and second Rhode Island Regiments, persons of color amounted to almost 15% of the men. In October 1777, these two regiments fought heroically  Fort Mercer and Mifflin, Delaware River forts that prevented the British Army in Philadelphia from receiving supplies by water.

Lose No Time.

At the beginning of October 1777, only militia manned Fort Mercer. On October 9, Colonel Christopher Greene, commander of the first Rhode Island., receive orders from General George Washington, to “lose no time,” in moving his regiment to Fort Mercer. Over the next two days, it’s 250 men marched 48 miles without sleep.

October 18th, the Second Rhode Island Regiment arrived at Fort Mercer. The two regiments alternated between duty at Fort Mifflin, digging and carpentering at Mercer, and training to defend the ramparts. October 21st, their work at Mercer intensified after learning that 1600 Hessians were coming to attack the Fort.

A Bloody Victory

October 22nd., the Hessians attack began about 4:00 PM with a twenty minute cannonade, followed by 1000 Hessians assailing the fort. Some Rhode Islands fired blindly, while others remained calm, methodically shooting the attacking Germans. The Hessian assault was brave but doomed. Lashed by artillery and musketry the Hessian struggled through the abatis, filled in sections of the ditch were hundreds of brush, and attempted to climb the ramparts.  The vertical ramparts; however, proved too high to scale without ladders. Forty-Five minutes after it began the attack collapsed, and the Hessians began the retreat, returning to Philadelphia. They suffered over 380 officers and men killed, wounded and captured. The Rhode Islanders had fourteen officers and men killed and at least 23 wounded. Including “Tom Reynolds, “Fort Mercer was a continental victory, one of the most complete of the American Revolution.

 

New Jersey American soldiers in American Revolution include Oliver Cromwell, (born in Black Horse (Now Columbus), Burlington County, as a freeman. Cromwell participated in almost every major battle of the war’s northern campaign and endured the same depredations as other soldiers in Jockey Hollow during the Winter there. He expressed great pride in George Washington signing his discharge after having served for six years in New Jersey Second Regiment.

His famous 1851 painting Washington Crossing, the Delaware artist Emmanuel included  a black man handling an oar to propel the Durham boat to the Jersey Shore. Some have claimed this. detects Oliver Cromwell.

Titus, a 22-year-old enslaved man escaped his bonds in Shrewsberry, New Jersey, during 1775 and travelled to Norfolk with other Monmouth County men of color to join Virginia Governor Dunmore’s Ethiopian regiment, The British offered freedom at wars end through any and slave man who fought for them, and many took them at their word. Dunmore disbanded the regiment in 1776. Titus then remained unknown until the Battle Monmouth in June 1778.  Leader of the Black Parade., Titus became known as Colonel Tye, and he rode with the Queens Rangers. Tye’s Brigade gained notoriety totality in 1780, from a series of raids, including one against Joshua Huddy. Tye suffered wound there that caused his demise from gangrene within weeks.

Excerpt from a letter from Monmouth County,

Tye, with his party of about 20, black and whites, left Friday afternoon, and carried off prisoners Captain Barnes Smock and Gilbert Vanmater; at the same time spiked up the Iron 4 pounder at Captain Smock’s horses, but took no ammunition: two of the artillery horses, and two of Captain Smocks horses were likewise taken off.

” The above-mentioned Tye is a negroe, who bears the title of Colonel, and commands a motly crew at Sandy Hook.

New Jersey Gazette, June 14th, 1780, Page 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regiments.

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Our Chapter Celebrates Its 100th Anniversary

Our Chapter Celebrates Its 100th Anniversary

The South Jersey Chapter of the SAR celebrated its 100 th Anniversary in September. In order to commemorate the event, a luncheon was held at Ramblewood Country Club in Mount Laurel, New Jersey. The event was well attended and well received by eighty-two participants...

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Rich Serfass on the Battleship New Jersey

Rich Serfass on the Battleship New Jersey

Rich Serfass, president of the SJC SAR, had the honor of presenting the Sons of the American Revolution Navy Sea Cadet bronze medal to a cadet from the USS Battleship New Jersey Sea Cadets on the Battleship’s main deck. Dressed in a uniform that mirrored that of a...

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SJCSAR with the Civil Air Patrol at McGuire Air Force Base

SJCSAR with the Civil Air Patrol at McGuire Air Force Base

SJC President Rich Serfass spent Monday evening visiting the Civil Air Patrol at McGuire Air Force Base. "It was my privilege to present the Sons of the American Revolution bronze citizenship medal to Cadet Tech Sgt. Clayton. It was my first time at a CAP event and I...

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South Jersey Chapter at the South Jersey History Fair

South Jersey Chapter at the South Jersey History Fair

South Jersey Chapter, SAR participated in the South Jersey History Fair in Glendora, NJ. Thank you to the Chapter members who helped make this day enjoyable and productive: Jim Howard, Jay Eitner, Bill Dorman, Carl, Hausmann, Sam Davis, and Roger Long. Be sure to...

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SJCSAR Teaching at Redbank Battlefield

SJCSAR Teaching at Redbank Battlefield

Rich Serfass, president of the SJC SAR, recently enjoyed the opportunity to lead a tour of the Red Bank Battlefield for a group of homeschool students and their parents. The tour took showcased both the battlefield and the historic 1748 Whitall House situated within...

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SJCSAR at a School Open House

SJCSAR at a School Open House

Larry Nelson, South Jersey Chapter Secretary, visited Saint Mary’s School of the Our Lady of Peace Parish in Williamstown NJ during the open house for Catholic Schools Week. Larry was with his granddaughter, who was portraying Betsy Ross in her earlier years. I wonder...

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